Tag Archives: life

Collision, Concussion, Consequence

carcrash3.1If you follow me on different platforms–okay, primarily Twitter, truth told–you’ll know I was in a car accident about a week ago.  At first, I considered myself unhurt, applying the rather incomplete and stupid standard of, “No bleeding, no broken bones, able to walk–I’m good.”  Then I spent the night with an increasing painful headache, dropping off to sleep whether I wanted to or not, and awakening over and over with room-spinning nausea.  Word mix-ups, wonky scent and taste perception, and time distortions came next.

Yep.  Concussion.

So I’ve been under all sorts of restrictions, including time spent on any sort of screen.  Much more than thirty minutes in, and I have to quit for at least a couple of hours because the headache and blurry vision start closing in.

Writing by hand is a tad easier, simply because–unlike computer work–the vision starts to blur before the headache comes along.  Believe me, as much as I’d rather speed along on the computer, I’ll take the blurry-vision warning over the headache any day.  But it does mean I pretty much can’t work right now.

Putting together a blog post over the course of two days is one thing, but copyediting ad and marketing copy is quite another.  And keeping the plot straight while revising a multi-POV novel.

Ha. Ha. Ha.

So while I’m waiting for my smooshed brain to recover, I’ll just remind y’all my Patreon is still plugging along with original articles on self-defense, fight scenes, whiskey, and puppers.  A dollar a month gets you first-eyes access.  In the next four weeks, there will be a new fight scene analysis, too, so it’s a good time to jump in if you haven’t already!

And I’m having a Post-Collision Concussion Sale on all the novels!  Sand of Bone, Breath of Stone, and the stand-alone Sword and Chant are all only $2.99 until the doctors clear me to resume working.  If you’ve been waiting for the price-drop, this is your chance!  If you liked any of them, please pass along the links!  If you didn’t like them at all… well, thank you for sticking with me anyway!  🙂

Next week, brain willing, I’ll also be talking about the upcoming Sirens Conference, timing for new releases, and the cookbook that I swear I haven’t forgotten.

So in the meantime… Stay safe, my Darlings, and enjoy this season of transition.

#SFWApro

 

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A Work In Progress, I Am

Today’s long day at the distillery gave me a lesson.

Yes, I still love and adore my job.  Nearly every person who comes in is in a good mood and ready to be in an even better one.  And nearly everyone is happy with the person giving the tour because, well, I give them whiskey not once, but twice.

Nearly everyone.  Nearly.

It’s still a customer service position, and as such, there will always be someone not happy.  Or someone who is happy, but high maintenance.  Or someone who will never, ever be happy, and that level of unhappiness has nothing to do with their surroundings and activities.  This is the person who will actively seek a reason for their unhappiness, right down to whether they have to take twenty-seven steps to reach a destination when everyone else seems to take a mere twenty-six and three-quarters.

(Certainly there are those for whom the quarter-step is an actual imposition, a painful addition, or an unreasonable expectation.  Those aren’t the folks I’m speaking of.)

And those folks often trick us into believing that last quarter-step is important.  Or their misery over that quarter-step is important.  Or the threat of their overblown dissatisfaction with that quarter-step is important.  And once that trick is played, the obligation for solving it is transferred to us as well.

And most times, we know both the trick and the obligation are bullshit, but we fall for the trick anyway, and then are angry we were made to feel an obligation.  And we try to find a way to either duck the obligation, or meet the obligation in a way that doesn’t actually make the person happy because that feels like a “win.”

This is the root of pettiness.  On both sides.

I fell into the trap today, took a quick walk, and decided I didn’t want to be petty any longer.

Look: No matter our social and political leanings, there are great and wonderful and terrifying and inspiring things happening in our world today.  Those things deserve my energy.  Matching petty-for-petty does not.  Answering someone’s act of petty nastiness with equally petty nastiness accomplishes nothing.  Answering petty nastiness with civility often accomplishes nothing for the other person as well…  But it accomplishes a great deal for me.

I don’t waste my energy.  I don’t waste me time.  I don’t waste my emotional reserves.

I solve the problem, or I don’t because I can’t, and that’s the end of it.

So today my goal became to leave as much pettiness behind as I can.  To leave behind the deep-rooted need to respond in kind over little and meaningless nastiness.  To let go of the false notion of “winning” in the game of pettiness, and strive instead to understand in the moment how little pettiness matters.

Pettiness is exhausting.  I have more important things to do.

Now we’ll see how long I can hold on to this decision…

#SFWApro

Just A Little Preparation

FoodStorageEvery now and then, for reasons I can’t always suss out, folks in my social sphere bring up disaster preparedness independently of each other. This time, it seems it’s come about as part of general insecurities and concerns triggered by election talk… which we ARE NOT going to discuss in specifics here, please, darlings! Suffice it to say I’ve had three conversations with politically diverse folks who share some of the same anxieties.

But there’s one conversation in particular that struck me as needing to be addressed, so here ya go:

For at least two years, this friend of mine has been mentioning her desire to start storing extra food. For two years, she hasn’t started. And she hasn’t started because, once she starts looking up “food storage” on the internet, she gets overwhelmed with talk about grinding her own healthy grains, storing a gazillion gallons of water, how to sprout seeds at any time of year, making jerky in her oven, dehydrating a year’s harvest, constructing a canned-goods rotation system, making her own all-natural herbal tinctures, stockpiling veterinary antibiotics… You get the idea.

She hasn’t started because anything she could think of as a starting place seemed inadequate. Almost useless, even.

I took a little Google-toodle around and… Yes, the overwhelm is strong on this topic. My favorite was the three-month list that included adequate supplies for one person to bake bread.

Sorry–my family ain’t getting freshly baked bread in an emergency. We can do just fine without bread in a short-term emergency, and if it’s a long-term crisis, I just don’t see myself expending all that energy–and cooking fuel–to bake bread. YMMV.

Besides, most folks who want to store food don’t know how to bake bread anyway.

So here’s the list I gave my friend as a starting place:
5 lbs quick cooking oats
2 lbs sugar
10 lbs white rice (Yes, brown rice is nutrient-rich. It also takes a long time to cook.)
5 lbs. dried fruit
12 cans of beans (chili, baked, plain, etc.)
24 cans of fruit
24 cans of veggies
12 cans of meat (chicken, tuna, beef, etc.)
12 cans of soup/stew/ravioli type stuff
1 big bottle of olive oil
1 big jar of peanut butter
1 big bag hard candy and/or mini-chocolates
1 big container of Tang or Tang-ish drink mix
1-2 big box(es) of crackers
Assorted teas and/or instant coffee
Powdered milk
Multivitamin/calcium
20 gallons of water

If she had a pet, I’d add a month’s worth of pet food and water, too.

It’ll last one person about one month, or four people about a week.

A quick-n-dirty off-the-top-of-my-head calculation puts the cost at between $200 and $250, depending on brands and price differences–way too much for her to purchase all at once. So we broke the list down into eight segments, and prioritized the items according to her needs. We added a little Sterno cookstove and fuel, too.

Questions she asked:
What the heck am I going to do with two whole pounds of sugar?
Sweeten your tea/coffee and oatmeal. Mix it with some of the oats and peanut butter (heck, nutella, if you’d rather) for quick and filling no-bake “cookies.” You probably won’t use all the sugar, but sugar is cheap.

But those canned meal things are full of fat and salt!
And food. They are full of food.

What’s all that candy for?
When you’re stressed, and when the kids are cranky, treats are good. Very, very good.

That’s a lot of water!
Water is cheap, and water is priceless. Twenty gallons gives you a bit less than a gallon a day–well within average use, but not ideal. That’s why you’ll drink the juice from your canned fruits and use the liquid from canned veggies to supplement cooking rice. Water is also a pain in the rear to store, especially with limited space, so we do what we can.

***

My friend was thinking of food storage from the perspective of a more natural disaster–a bad snow storm that made roads impassible for days, floods or wildfires that limit supermarket restocking, that sort of thing.

To that, I’ll add the reason food storage is important to me: inflation and income insecurity. Not too many years ago, my food storage sometimes became my grocery store. What we ate that week came from what was stored under my bed. Sure, these days I can put a little cash aside, but what $20 will buy today is more than it’ll buy after six months of economic hardship. Storing the food makes more sense to me than storing the cash.

So there it is: a quick starting place that has nothing to do with suddenly living off the grid after a solar flare destroys the grid, causing global collapse that results in a landscape of crumbling infrastructure run by gun-toting looters riding mutant bison past zombie herds. It has everything to do with making sure you’re not hungry on the third day of a fixable power outage, and mega-everything to do with ensuring emergency response personnel can focus on those who can’t prepare for disasters.

And, yeah, it’s knowing you can still feed your kids if the next paycheck suddenly vaporizes.

 

Originally posted at These Certain Musings.  Comment here or there!

 

#SFWApro

Full-time Person, Part-time Writer

ImpatientPups

This is what it looks like when my pups decide I’ve been writing–and thus not paying attention to them–for too long.  They aren’t the only creatures in this world to hold such opinions from time to time, but they are the only ones permitted to express it by shoving their noses in my face and panting in my ear.

The last three weeks have been productive on the writing front, though more on the non-fiction side of my projects.  (For information on those, check out Wellness for Real Life.)  But this last week, I set aside most of my writerly time for fiction.  Sand of Bone is, at long and long last, shaping into the story it ought to be.

I am not a full-time writer and, though I daily wish for a little more writing time, I don’t think I want writing to be my sole employment.  I love my other work far too much to give it all up.

Teaching karate not only enhances my own training, it permits me to see and partake in a life-changing process for children and adults.  I watch children who believe themselves incapable begin to realize they can make changes in their own lives.  I watch teens find solid footing while transitioning between child and adult.  I watch adults discover their bodies are capable of so much more than they imagined, that they don’t need to move like a twenty-something to be a success, that training to fight is also about learning to play.  I get to be witness to, and a part of, the process of trust-building.

The experiences–day to day, and cumulative–inform everything I write.  It’s easy to point to a fight scene as evidence of the last dozen years I’ve spent in martial arts.  Less easy to see and understand are the character relationships and personalities.  While I certainly don’t see my students under life-or-death pressure, I see them responding to fear and shame and shock and embarrassment and anger and frustration, as well as experiencing arrogance and confidence and joy and satisfaction and understanding and enlightenment.  I see what happens when those emotions are encountered by people of all ages, who come from all different backgrounds.

If you want to understand a character’s journey, watch a ten-year-old who has never been physical go from being deeply afraid of doing jumping-jacks to smiling with a partner during an intense solid-contact sparring match.  Watch a parent learn to let their own children fail.  Watch an adult discover that tension doesn’t translate into power, then apply that lesson to their personal relationships.  I get to see that sort of thing happen over and over, chapter by chapter, as my students work their way up the ranks.  I can’t imagine doing anything more enjoyable with my life.  I can’t imagine what my writing would be without it.

Er, actually, I can imagine it.  I can read it, in fact, since I recently found some of my writing from twenty years ago.  It is so, so bad.

Trust me, Readers.  Karate–specifically, teaching karate–has helped shape my writing as surely as the benevolent writers and editors who patiently taught me storycraft.  Giving up one would deeply damage the other.