Tag Archives: cooking

Cookbook Call!

We’re getting closer…

Working on this little cookbook has been a blast. As I’ve said before, I don’t know if anyone really wants it, but I really wanted to do it. This is my way of nurturing myself and y’all.  This isn’t a huge cookbook–we’re looking at about fifty recipes, and some random chitchat all told–but I hopeful it’ll be helpful.

The goal is to give you a set of recipes you can use, adapt, and re-create as your own over time.  Recipes that’ll feed a single, or a couple, or a family without breaking the banks of time and money.

Now I’d love to include you in the process!

I’m on the hunt for recipe testers. You do not have to be a professional cook. You don’t even need to be a good cook. I just need someone willing to follow the recipe, and give me honest feedback that includes if and how well the recipe instilled confidence in the cook, and if it produced the desired results. Testers are welcome—nay, begged to—offer any other comments, suggestions, and feedback.

Every recipe tester will be acknowledged in the cookbook (unless anonymity is preferred), and receive the completed cookbook in ebook format. There might be a few tester-comments that’ll make their way into the book, toom with appropriate permission.

Below is the list of recipes I’m looking to test, and am looking to have feedback in by December 23. All you need to do is go down the list, choose what sounds good (or ask clarifying questions first), and let me know in the comments what you’d like to test in your own home. I’ll email or direct-message the recipe to you within twenty-four hours.

A couple of general notes:

–A couple of the recipes are crockpot-only, but most include instructions for more than one cooking method.
–If you’re looking for recipes that’ll match certain dietary guidelines, let me know and I’ll point out the ones that’ll match.
–Most of the meat-containing recipes also include notes on being flexible with meat options.
–Some recipes are far less expensive or more expensive to test than others. If this is a concern but you still want to test, please drop me a private note and we’ll make something work.
–If you’ve cooked one of my publicly-posted recipes before and have feedback—and it doesn’t matter if that recipe is included below!—do feel free to pass it along.

Here are your current recipe choices!

Bacon BBQ Chicken
Balsamic Pork
Beef and Cabbage
Broth from the Carcass
Chicken Broccoli Cheese
Cilantro Lime Chicken
Coconut Curry Chicken
Ham and Asparagus Alfredo
Lentils and Rice
Lentil Soup
Peanut Chicken
Potato Nutmeg Soup
Roasted Turkey/Chicken
Sausage Dressing Bake
Spaghetti and Meat Sauce
Spinach Bacon Mac and Cheese
Tortilla Soup

Recipes coming soon:
Soup (Yes, all kinds of soup, in one recipe. Trust me.)
Beef Stew
Chicken Salad Three Ways
Pork Carnitas
Spiced Meatballs
Brussels Sprouts with Bleu Cheese Balsamic
Squash, Summer and Winter
Fried Apples
Sweet Corn Cake
Sloppy Joes

Anything sound interesting to y’all?

 

#SFWApro

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This Is How I Nurture

I began the month with great hope of making marvelous progress on the novella I’m serializing at Patreon as well as the third book of Desert Rising. That… became a struggle. Oh, I’ve made some progress, but not at all what I wanted.

Instead, I’ve made marvelous progress on the cookbook.

I have no idea if anyone, anywhere, will have any interest in this thing, but wow have I been motivated to work on it.

Y’see, I can’t feed y’all from here, so putting together and sharing recipes is the next best thing. A nurturing thing. An attempt-to-give-comfort thing.

Someone asked me the cookbook’s “theme.”

That would be, “Stuff I Like To Cook and Eat That Doesn’t Cost A Fortune Or Take Forever To Make.” Yeah, there are a couple more complicated and/or expensive ones, but they’re the great minority.

I mentioned on Twitter that I’ll be looking for recipe testers pretty soon, and I’ll make sure to announce it here in case there are interested folks. And if you’ve already tried one of the recipes I’ve posted here in the past and have comments, concerns, problems with it, and so forth, please let me know!

And now I continue, this time with Lentil Soup.

#SFWApro

If You Need A Little Turkey Help…

Last year, I posted elsewhere on how to cook a whole turkey (and the same information works, on a smaller scale for whole chicken).  So here it is for you, Darlings!

* *

Roasting a turkey can be danged intimidating, considering the size of the thing you’re putting in the oven. Me, I learned how to make turkey-roasting, and chicken-roasting, work really well when I was dead broke. A whole bird costs way less than the already-prepped parts, and can provide better meals and nutrition on a tight, tight budget.

But roasting a whole turkey is much easier than cooking shows and sitcoms make it out to be. Here’s my foolproof — yes, foolproof! — way to make your chicken or turkey come out tasty and not-at-all-dry. I’m going to include basic steps, too, because not everyone is accustomed to cooking whole birds.

Continue reading If You Need A Little Turkey Help…

Here’s Your Caramel Sauce!

Later today, I’ll be “practicing” caramel sauce with my nephews. It’s an awesome, easy, and decadent thing to make for the holidays. I started doing it on Halloween when Dev was little because I could easy get him and his friends to eat apples before trick-or-treating. 🙂

All you need are five ingredients—water, sugar, butter, cream, vanilla—and you’ll want all them measured and at room temperature when you start the process. Caramel is pretty easy, but the cooking process moves quickly. The one way you can almost always ruin a batch is to interrupt the process once you start.

Also, don’t use anything plastic to stir and whisk while cooking. It will melt into the caramel. Eww.

And do use a whisk. It’s so much easier to get a smooth final sauce.

Okay! Ready?

Ingredients:
1 cup granulated sugar
1/4 cup water
1/2 cup heavy cream (I’ve used whole milk in a pinch, but the sauce will be thinner)
2 Tbsp butter cut into small pieces
1 tsp vanilla (optional)

Combine the water and sugar in a sauce pan over medium heat, and stir until the sugar dissolves completely. (If you want to be picky, be careful not to let sugar granules cling to the sides of the pan. They can sometimes encourage your caramel to re-crystalize as it cools!)

Now: Once the sugar-water starts bubbling, don’t stir anymore. Just swirl the pan now and then to make sure the heat is even. Adjust the heat as needed to keep a steady and, um, non-violent? boil. Then watch the liquid turn a lovely pale amber. It should be about he color of fresh honey, NOT as dark as you’d think for caramel.

It might take about ten minutes or so.

A little at a time, whisk in the room temperature cream. Please be careful pouring the cream into the hot sugar liquid. I don’t want you burned by the splatter. Been there, done that, don’t want to go there again.

Remove the pan from the heat immediately, and whisk in the butter.

Add vanilla, if you’d like.

If you want salted caramel, now is the time to add your kosher salt. Maybe half to a full teaspoon, depending on your preference.

If your sauce seems too thin, warm it—stirring constantly—over low heat. But keep in mind the sauce will thicken as it cools!

If your sauce seems too thick, stir in a little more cream, a tablespoon at a time.

That’s it! Drizzle it over pie or ice cream or sliced apples or cake or popcorn or nuts or just your spoon…

#SFWApro

Five Fonts of Happiness

Mmm… Chinese food…

Ahem.

Five things that make me happy. Very well.

First, that mention of Chinese food does indeed make me happy. Mentioning Italian, Asian, Middle Eastern, American, Indian and European food makes me happy, too. I love food. I adore food. I don’t consider myself a foodie, or a great cook, or even a discerning eater. But taste and scent and texture—and sharing that experience with others—is a great joy. I remember the immense pleasure of eating fresh cilantro atop carne asada for the first time. I can recall the sweet tang of fresh tomatoes and cucumbers, tossed with feta and drizzled with balsamic vinegar. My mouth waters over what I was served at an Indian restaurant in Salt Lake City, though I can’t tell you what it was called. The fried green tomatoes and chutney I ate in Charleston were a delight. Tarragon chicken. Burgers and onion rings. Cannelloni con asparagi. Moo shu. Noodles with butter, garlic and oregano. Sweet corn. Beef barley stew. Cheesecake. Naan. Fried mushrooms. Hummus. French fries. Marinara. Steaks. Oh, yes, steaks. Food makes me smile from the inside out.

Unless it involves fish, and then I really don’t want anything to do with it.

Continue reading Five Fonts of Happiness